Geothermal Heat Pump and Energy Recovery Applications
ASHRAE Technical Committee 6.8

Upcoming Geothermal Educational Meetings / Orlando, Florida

 

TC 6.8 Programs

Sunday, February 2
5:00 PM–6:00 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, L, Sand Lake
Session Type: Technical Committee

TC 6.8 Research

Monday, February 3
4:15 PM–5:45 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, L, Maitland Boardroom
Session Type: Technical Committee

TC 6.8 Energy Recovery Applications

Tuesday, February 4
8:00 AM–9:00 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, L, Ruby Lake
Session Type: Technical Committee

TC 6.8 Geothermal Heat Pump and Energy Recovery Applications

Tuesday, February 4
3:30 PM–6:00 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, L, Lake Highland B
Session Type: Technical Committee

 

 

GEOTHERMAL SEMINARS IN ORLANDO

Sunday, Feb 2, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Seminar 19: Cutting-Edge Japanese Technologies SHASE Award for ZEB in 2019

Sunday, February 2
1:30 PM–3:00 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E
Program Level: Intermediate
Program Track: Cutting Edge Approaches
Session Type: Seminar

Summary:
Three SHASE-awarded and "ZEB-oriented" office buildings are introduced in this session. The adopted technologies include: natural ventilation, daylighting, building facade covered with plants, cool/heat tube, radiant heating/cooling system, thermo-active building system, ground source heat pump, adsorption chiller with solar energy, independent AHUs for sensible and latent heat and visual energy management system. Energy consumption was reduced by 50 to 70 percent compared to reference buildings in these three buildings, which are located in the north, south and Tokyo, respectively.

Chair:
Ryozo Ooka, Ph.D.

 

Seminar 19: Presentation 1: Design and Performance Verification of Green Buildings with the Aid of TABS

Time: 1:30 PM–1:50 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Design and Performance Verification of Green Buildings with the Aid of TABS
Presenting Author: Hiroshi Muramatsu, Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

This presentation introduces a green building which located in urban Tokyo. It features a green façade, balcony and perimeter aisles as thermal buffer zones, a renewable energy heat-source system, a natural ventilation system with windows that open and close automatically and thermo-active building systems (TABS) to realize ZEB. TABS not only conserves energy but also stabilizes and enhances the indoor thermal environment. In addition, TABS with a large thermal capacity can help store heat for early-morning cool air by opening and closing windows automatically.

 

 Seminar 19: Presentation 2: Medium-Sized Offices in Urban Areas Tackling Energy Consumption Reduction and Targeting ZEB
Time: 1:50 PM–2:10 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Medium-Sized Offices in Urban Areas Tackling Energy Consumption Reduction and Targeting ZEB
Presenting Author: Akihiko Ota, Shimizu Corporation, Osaka, Japan

This presentation introduces eco-friendly medium-sized offices in urban areas tackling energy consumption reduction and targeting ZEB.

This building has adopted various “energy-saving systems” in combination with passive methods (Perimeter load reduction, daylighting, natural ventilation) and active methods (new radiation air-conditioning system), to utilize natural energy (sunlight, wind, underground heat) effectively with collaboration between Architect and Engineer.

Thanks to this project, visualizing energy and remote-operation improvement with a cloud server allows this building to reduce energy consumption by 71.1% compared with a reference model building.

 

Seminar 19: Presentation 3: Environmental Systems and Equipment Design in ZEB City Halls in Cold Regions

Time: 2:10 PM–2:30 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Environmental Systems and Equipment Design in ZEB City Halls in Cold Regions
Presenting Author: Satoki Hoshino, Nihon Sekkei, Inc., Tokyo, Japan

This presentation introduces the ZEB city hall in Akita city. The key achievement here is scope to demonstrate the potential of ZEB in cold regions. By combining geothermal trenches, heat exchangers, and CO2 concentration control, we reduced the outside air load by 64%. We have integrated technologies including variable air volume whole floor-blowoff air conditioning system and optimization of chilling/heating water temperature, high-efficiency geothermal heat pumps, utilization of boreholes for snow melting in summer, and heat storage tanks. The annual energy consumption has been reduced by 61.8% is confirmed at a ZEB-Ready level for SHASE.

Learning Objectives:
• Describe the approach in cold regions for ZEB that integrates air conditioning load reduction by passive buildings and variable air volume whole floor blowoff air conditioning system and heat source system using geothermal heat-pump.
• Describe outside air-supply systems that minimizes the outside air load of cold regions by geothermal trench, heat recovery whole building using atrium and optimization of outside air volumes.

 



 

 

   

Monday, Feb 3, 8:00 AM - 9:30 PM

 

 Seminar 27: Black, Grey and Almost Clean: Energy Recovery with GSHPs

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orlando V
Program Level: Intermediate
Program Track: Cutting Edge Approaches

Summary:
Conventional geothermal systems can post certain challenges with respect to installation costs, space constraints and availability of labor. Water-based systems only need a sink and source and that could come from unconventional sources. This session highlights projects and the potential to cost effectively reclaim energy from waste water. Speakers exchange first-hand experiences to reclaim energy from black and grey water, abandoned mines, reclaimed municipal water and retention pond with treated wastewater.

Chair:
Roshan Revankar

Technical Committee:
6.8 Geothermal Heat Pump and Energy Recovery Applications

 

Seminar 27: Presentation 1: Case Studies of Water Source Heat Pump Systems Using Unconventional Sources

Monday, February 3
8:00 AM–8:20 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orlando V

Case Studies of Water Source Heat Pump Systems Using Unconventional Sources
Presenting Author: Xiaobing Liu, Ph.D., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA

This presentation introduces two unique water source heat pump systems that use unconventional sources. The first system utilizes the water in an abandoned mine as the heat sink and heat source of a heat pump through a closed-loop heat exchanger. The second system is a hybrid system that makes use of reclaimed municipal water to supplement conventional boiler and cooling tower. The system design, measured performance, and lessons learned from these projects will be presented.

 

Seminar 27: Presentation 2: Does Black + Grey = Green Energy?

Monday, February 3
8:20 AM–8:40 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orlando V

Does Black + Grey = Green Energy?
Presenting Author: Stephen Hamstra, P.E., Melink Solar and Geo, Milford, OH, USA

The use of waste water, both grey and black, as a heat source or sink is not a new concept, but until recently the availability of cost-effective factory-constructed systems has been limited. Now that those options are in the marketplace, new barriers of “we’ve never done this before” need to be overcome with good engineering and application guidelines along with case studies of a variety of projects. This presentation will discuss the unique features of this type of technology, how it could be combined with ground-source heat pumps and finally, some case studies of actual installations.

 

Seminar 27: Presentation 3: Recycled Water as Source Water for Geothermal Heat Pumps

Monday, February 3
8:40 AM–9:00 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orlando V

Recycled Water as Source Water for Geothermal Heat Pumps
Presenting Author: Lisa Meline, P.E., Meline Engineering Corporation, Sacramento, CA, USA

A new building was constructed at the Sonoma County Water Agency wastewater treatment plant in Santa Rosa, CA in support of their fleet and service operations. Due to the proximity of the retention pond of treated wastewater, a plan was devised to take advantage of this feature as a heat exchange medium. This presentation will discuss the unique features of the project site, its challenges, and will feature the simplicity of the geothermal heat pump system design and operation.

 

 

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Wednesday, Feb 5, 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Seminar 73: Refrigerants and Refrigeration with Ground Source Heat Pumps

Wednesday, February 5
11:00 AM–12:30 PM
Program Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Seminar
Program Track: Refrigeration and Refrigerants
Location: Hilton Orlando, Orange E

Summary:
This session explores the usage and effects of next generation low-GWP refrigerants on ground source heat pump design and application.

Chair:
Brendan Hall, P.E.

Technical Committee:
6.8 Geothermal Heat Pump and Energy Recovery Applications

Seminar 73: Presentation 1: Minimizing Flammable Refrigerant Charge in Residential GSHPs

Wednesday, February 5
11:00 AM–11:20 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Minimizing Flammable Refrigerant Charge in Residential GSHPs
Presenting Author: Björn Palm, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

Ground source heat pumps are very common for heating single family buildings in Scandinavia, and particularly in Sweden. With new restrictions concerning the global warming potential of the refrigerant used, we will most probably see flammable refrigerants in these units in the future. For the safe use of flammable refrigerants, it is desirable to decrease the charge of refrigerant, without decreasing the efficiency of the systems. In this seminar, examples will be given of systems and components (heat exchangers, compressors etc.) designed for minimum charge of refrigerant.

 

Seminar 73: Presentation 2: Impact of Refrigerant Options upon Unitary Equipment for Commercial Buildings

Wednesday, February 5
11:20 AM–11:40 AM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Impact of Refrigerant Options upon Unitary Equipment for Commercial Buildings
Presenting Author: Steve Kavanaugh, Ph.D., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA

The global transition to refrigerants with low Global Warming Potential (GWPs) will impact safety, performance and economics of unitary HVAC equipment. Several options have an A2L safety designation (non-toxic, mildly flammable) and A3 (non-toxic, flammable) refrigerants also are being considered. This presentation will compare the current R-410a refrigerant quantities for equipment options applied to a 16,000 ft2 (1,500 m2) office building. Options include rooftop units, split-system heat pumps, variable refrigerant flow heat pumps, and ground source heat pumps. The discussion will include effects upon efficiency and recharging issues of blended refrigerants.

 

Seminar 73: Presentation 3: Refrigeration Heat Recovery

Wednesday, February 5
11:40 AM–12:00 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Refrigeration Heat Recovery
Presenting Author: Ed Lohrenz, GEOptimize Inc., Winnipeg, MB, Canada

Heat is a by-product of every vapor compression refrigeration system. In most systems that heat is simply dissipated to the atmosphere through a cooling tower. Refrigeration systems are often located in the same buildings or near buildings requiring space heating, domestic hot water or process heat. Taking advantage of the storage capacity of the ground and using heat pumps to maximize the use of heat from refrigeration systems that would otherwise be discarded. It may be less costly to harvest waste heat to use in the facility than pay for the energy to get rid of it.

 

Seminar 73: Presentation 4: Measurements and Energy Analysis for a Prototype Carbon Dioxide Ground Source Heat Pump

Wednesday, February 5
12:00 PM–12:30 PM

Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange E

Measurements and Energy Analysis for a Prototype Carbon Dioxide Ground Source Heat Pump
Presenting Author: Harrison Skye, Ph.D., National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

A prototype CO2 water-to-air GSHP was constructed and tested in a laboratory per the International Standards Organization (ISO) standard 13256-1. The refrigerant charge was varied to find the values that respectively optimized the COP and capacity. This charge optimization study was repeated over a range of entering liquid temperatures, with the GSHP operating in both subcritical and transcritical mode. Measurements included power consumption, capacity, as well as refrigerant temperature, pressure, and flow.

 






 UPCOMING TECHNICAL PAPER SESSIONS IN ORLANDO


Tuesday Feb 4, 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

 Paper Session 20: Heat Pumps and Hybrid Systems

  1. Tuesday, February 4
    11:00 AM–12:30 PM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B
    Program Track: Systems and Equipment
    Location: Hilton Orlando, Orange B

    Summary:
    This session centers around novel heat pumps and hybrid systems, including micro combined heat and power systems, natural gas hybrid systems, district energy networks, chemisorption heat pipes and combined ground source heat pumps/chillers. The first paper simulates a Korean multi-family building, including building energy analysis by comparing the conventional grid and boiler system to the micro-combined heat and power system. The second paper summarizes the performance of a hybrid system (gas furnace + electric air source heat pump) operating with smart controls in an actual field context. The third paper presents a proposed system in London to incorporate a range of different renewables and secondary energy sources that will supply a large proportion of the energy demand of the overall district network capacity. The fourth paper presents chemisorption heat pump operation in cycles of two alternating modes: adsorption and desorption. The final paper simulates a hospital in Norway and shows that when using extract air coil for heating well holes, it is possible to reduce both the number of wells and the spacing between the wells with up to 30%, thus decreasing the installation cost for a ground storage facility significantly.

    Chair:
    Ming Qu, Ph.D.

     

    Paper Session 20: Presentation 1: Energy, Environmental, Economic Evaluation of Residential Building with Micro-CHP in South Korea (OR-20-C060)

    Tuesday, February 4
    11:00 AM–11:20 AM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B

    Energy, Environmental, Economic Evaluation of Residential Building with Micro-CHP in South Korea (OR-20-C060)
    Presenting Author: Yujun Jung, Korea university, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South)
    Author: Hoseong Lee, Korea university, Seoul, Korea, Republic of (South)

    In South Korea, energy consumption of the building section accounts for 21% of the total energy consumption. When it comes to residential buildings, it takes 11% of the total energy consumption. The energy consumption is estimated to increase continuously as world energy consumption increases. In addition, CO2 emission has been increased accordingly. To reduce carbon emissions, Korean government set their emission reduction target to be 37% by 2030 based on BAU (business as usual) emission projections, corresponding to the Paris Agreement. In order to reduce energy consumption and emission, a micro-CHP (Combined Heating and Power) is suggested to be applied in the typical Korean residential building. Based on the Korean multi-family building, the building energy analysis is conducted by comparing the conventional grid and boiler system to the micro-CHP system. The CHP model is developed with combining the stratified tank, and it is operated with the thermal load following method. Especially, the floor heating system is applied to the building. The results are presented with effect of the CHP system with weather condition and scenario of surplus electricity, in terms of annual energy consumption, environmental impact, and economic evaluation. According to the above results, it can be seen that the CHP application in the residential building in Korea has advantage in terms of energy saving and CO2 reduction. However, there is not much benefit from an economic point of view. The main reason is the utility rate policy in Korea. Gas price is relatively expensive and electricity price is relatively cheap as compared to other countries. Since it is not easy to change the utility rate right now due to the complicated interest relations, there must be government incentives on using CHP systems. Moreover, it is revealed that the CHP is more effective when the building is located in colder area or consumes more thermal energy. Therefore, it would be interesting to apply CHP systems to various type of buildings, such as hospital, hotel, and schools.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Provide an overview of CHP applied building in Korea.
    • Describe the CHP effect of residential building section.

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    Paper Session 20: Presentation 2: Opportunities for Hybrid Systems: Natural Gas Furnace + Air Source Heat Pump + Smart Switching Controls (OR-20-C061)

    Tuesday, February 4
    11:20 AM–11:40 AM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B

    Opportunities for Hybrid Systems: Natural Gas Furnace + Air Source Heat Pump + Smart Switching Controls (OR-20-C061)
    Presenting Author: Jeremy Sager, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada

    As part of Canada’s commitment to climate change, via the Pan Canadian Framework on Climate Change, Natural Resources Canada has identified heat pumps to be a key technology that can significantly reduce GHG emissions in the residential sector.

    NRCan’s CanmetENERGY laboratories have undertaken extensive testing of air source heat pumps and used the results of these tests to assess the cost effectiveness, energy savings and GHG reductions in different house vintages for locations across Canada. The results of this work indicate that, in greater than 35% of Canada’s existing housing stock, replacing a natural gas furnace with an electric heat pump and electric backup, while reducing GHG emissions in many locations, is not cost effective to the homeowner in most locations. To address this, work was undertaken with a builder and manufacturing partner at a demonstration home to assess the performance of a hybrid system that couples an air source heat pump with a high performance natural gas space heating system. Findings from this work indicated that, while such systems show significant potential to cost effectively reduce energy use and save GHG emissions, in order for their full potential to be exploited (particularly in regions with time of use electricity rate structures, such as Ontario), smart controls are needed.

    Such smart controls would enable the system to switch from heat pump to natural gas backup during space heating operation, depending on the following known parameters:

    Outdoor air temperature Utility rates and time of use Performance of the heat pump Performance of the natural gas furnace This paper summarizes the performance of a hybrid system (gas furnace + electric air source heat pump) operating with smart controls in an actual field context. It presents overall energy savings, GHG reductions and comfort impacts. It identifies several opportunities for improving space heating performance of hybrid systems with smart switching controls and highlights an early market entry opportunity for this type of system.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Explain how hybrid systems with smart switching controls work
    • Describe how hybrid system can save on utility costs, even in areas with access to low cost natural gas and higher cost electricity

     

    Paper Session 20: Presentation 3: Initial Assessment of a 5th Generation District Energy Network in Central London (OR-20-C062)

    Tuesday, February 4
    11:40 AM–12:00 PM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B

    Initial Assessment of a 5th Generation District Energy Network in Central London (OR-20-C062)
    Presenting Author: Akos Revesz, Ph.D., London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Catarina Marques, Ph.D., London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Gareth Davies, Ph.D., London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Rodrigo Matabuena, Islington Council, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Phil Jones, Ph.D., Building Energy Solutions, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Chris Dunham, Carbon Descent, London, United Kingdom
    Author: Graeme Maidment, Ph.D., P.E., London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom

    The UK is committed to meeting carbon reduction targets to minimize the impact of energy use on climate change. Significant focus both in the UK and internationally has been on the decarbonisation of the electrical grid through the use of renewables, and its carbon intensity is reducing quickly. In addition, to address decarbonising the heating and cooling energy supply, a key element in the UK will be greatly increasing the deployment of local heating and cooling networks, primarily in urban areas. The use of district heat networks (DHNs) varies widely between different countries across the world. Many DHNs currently in operation are 3rd generation (3G) heat networks which generally consist of a two pipe pressurised hot water loop system, with heat delivered from an energy centre to end users at temperatures of 90-95°C (194-203°F). The most advanced network generation systems are the 4th generation (4G) energy networks which include: decentralised energy generation; renewable sources of energy; district heating; and smart grid technology, and operate at temperatures in the range 50–70°C (122-158°F). More recently 5G networks have been trialled and these types of networks are the subject of this paper. It introduces a concept design for the UK’s first large-scale 5G network using an area in central London as a case study. The proposed system will incorporate a range of different renewables and secondary energy sources that will supply large proportion of the energy demand of the overall district network capacity. The network will operate at close to ambient temperature, approximately 15-25°C (59-77°F) as a single loop system, with individual heat pumps for each end user or building connected to the network. Heat pumps can also be used to reduce the temperature of the water in the ambient loop to provide cooling for end users.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Appreciate and replicate the design process used in a development of a 5th generation smart energy network
    • Describe the types and development of energy networks and how they may be applied

     

    Paper Session 20: Presentation 4: Dynamic Modelling and Performance Evaluation of a Chemisorption Heat Pump for Cold Climate (OR-20-C063)

    Tuesday, February 4
    12:00 PM–12:20 PM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B

    Dynamic Modelling and Performance Evaluation of a Chemisorption Heat Pump for Cold Climate (OR-20-C063)
    Presenting Author: Zhiyao Yang, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
    Author: Ming Qu, Ph.D., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
    Author: Kyle Gluesenkamp, Ph.D., ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, USA

    Thermally-driven chemical adsorption (chemisorption) heat pumps have the potential to provide space and water heating in cold climate with energy efficiency higher than both conventional gas-fired furnaces and electric heat pumps.

    The chemisorption heat pump (CSHP) operates in cycles of two alternating modes: adsorption and desorption. During the adsorption mode, the refrigerant such as ammonia evaporates in the low-pressure evaporator to extract heat from the cold ambient, and the vapor is then adsorbed by the sorbent through reversible chemical reactions. The heat associated the adsorption reaction is supplied to the application. During the desorption mode, the sorbent is heated and releases refrigerant vapor, which later condensates in the condenser and supply heat to the application. The CSHP constantly operates under transient varying states, and therefore a buffer tank is needed to enable the system to supply heat smoothly and uninterruptedly, and the system needs to be actively controlled.

    With such complexity in system dynamic response, the control parameters such as the mode switching threshold and power input from heat source are critical for the CSHP system to supply heat with desired power and efficiency. The effectiveness of the different system controls needs to be evaluated by dynamically modelling the system operation.

    To investigate the performance of CSHP system, an ammonia-based prototype CSHP was built and tested at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for cold-climate heating applications. Natural gas was combusted to drive the heat pump prototype, which supplied heat through a buffer tank to the simulated heat load. In this study, a detailed dynamic model was developed for the CSHP system. The model takes the system design, working conditions, and operation controls as the inputs to predict the dynamic operational status as well as the overall heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) of the CSHP.

    The dynamic model was then used to evaluate the effect of system control variables including mode switch, burner power, and heat transfer fluid circulation on the system behavior and performance. The evaluation was carried out under different ambient and heat supply temperatures and buffer tank sizes. The model results demonstrated the effects of the investigated inputs and identified the control parameters leading to the optimal COP and capacity in each operating scenario.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Understand the basics of chemisorption heat pump technologies
    • Understand the opportunities and challenges of applying chemisorption heat pump to cold climate heating applications

     

  3. Paper Session 20: Presentation 5: Optimization of Design Solutions for Surplus Heating and Cooling System in Combination with Ground Source Heat Pump/Chillers (OR-20-C064)

    Tuesday, February 4
    12:20 PM–12:40 PM

    Location: Hilton Orlando, LL, Orange B

    Optimization of Design Solutions for Surplus Heating and Cooling System in Combination with Ground Source Heat Pump/Chillers (OR-20-C064)
    Presenting Author: Trond Thorgeir Harsem, P.Eng., Norconsult AS, Sandvika, Norway
    Author: Merethe Cecilie Lind, CEng, Norconsult AS, Sandvika, Norway
    Author: Karoline Husevåg Kvalsvik, P.Eng., Norconsult AS, Sandvika, Norway
    Author: Annette Fagerhaug Stephansen, Dr.Ing., P.Eng., Norconsult AS, Bergen, Norway
    Author: Jan Kocbach, Dr.Ing., Christian Michelsen Research, Bergen, Norway

    Hospitals are one of the building categories in Norway which have the highest specific energy consumption. Hospitals typically have an annual energy requirement of 300-400 kWh/m2 (95.1-126.8 kBtu/ft2). There is significant potential for optimization of the complex energy systems in hospitals by balancing the strongly varying requirements for heating and cooling as a function of time of day and time of year in different parts of the hospital.

    Sensitivity analysis of the thermal energy system with a focus on parameters of the ground storage system is enabled by combining different interactions between internal gains of hydronic heating, cooling, ground storage systems, and free cooling functions.

    In the planning of new hospitals, the number of wells, depth and the distance between wells is not calculated very precisely but by using rules of thumb. During this project, a simulation tool has been made with a focus on temperature levels in the ground storage.

    A simulation model has been built up based on the New Kirkenes Hospital (NKS), a 20.000 m2 (215200 ft2) regional hospital in Northern Norway using a combination of the commercial building simulation tool SIMIEN and the energy analysis and optimization tool VKB-sim. The simulations show the sensitivity of the energy system to changes in number of wells, well spacing, relative ventilation cooling factor and maximum regulation temperature for return flow.

    This study shows that when using extract air coil for heating well holes, it is possible to reduce both the number of wells and the spacing between the wells with up to 30%, thus decreasing the installation cost for a ground storage facility significantly.

    Learning Objectives:
    • How to calculate the total Seasonal Performance Factors (SPF) for the hole energy system when designing ground store heat pump / chillers in combination.
    • The importance of using extract heat/cooling from ventilation system to heat the borehole / control the temperature in the borehole.



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Attend a Committee Meeting

ALL ASHRAE committee meetings, including this TC’s meetings at the Winter and Annual Society conferences, are open to the public at no cost nor is conference registration required. Interested visitors, local chapter members, and potential new TC members are always welcome. However to attend technical program sessions sponsored by the TC will require registration and payment of any applicable fee.

Participation in an ASHRAE TC provides the opportunity to grow professionally and to contribute to the advancement of HVAC&R within an international organization recognized for shaping the future of the built environment through research, standards writing, publishing, and education.